Neck Solutions Blog

February 7, 2008

Whiplash and neck ligament strength

Filed under: Neck Pain,Whiplash — Administrator @ 9:40 am

Neck ligament strength is decreased following whiplash trauma

From: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2006, 7:103

Previous clinical studies have documented successful neck pain relief in whiplash patients using nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves. No previous study has documented injuries to the neck ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties of whiplash-exposed human cervical spine ligaments. Additionally, the present data were compared to previously reported control data. The ligaments included the anterior and posterior longitudinal, capsular, and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum.

A total of 98 bone-ligament-bone specimens (C2–C3 to C7-T1) were prepared from six cervical spines following 3.5, 5, 6.5, and 8 g rear impacts and pre- and post-impact flexibility testing. The specimens were elongated to failure at a peak rate of 725 (SD 95) mm/s. Failure force, elongation, and energy absorbed, as well as stiffness were determined. The mechanical properties were statistically compared among ligaments, and to the control data. The average physiological ligament elongation was determined using a mathematical model.

Results: For all whiplash-exposed ligaments, the average failure elongation exceeded the average physiological elongation. The highest average failure force of 204.6 N was observed in the ligamentum flavum, significantly greater than in middle-third disc and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments. The highest average failure elongation of 4.9 mm was observed in the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. The average energy absorbed ranged from 0.04 J by the middle-third disc to 0.44 J by the capsular ligament. The ligamentum flavum was the stiffest ligament, while the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments were most flexible. The whiplash-exposed ligaments had significantly lower failure force, 149.4 vs. 186.0 N, and a trend towards less energy absorption capacity, 308.6 vs. 397.0 J, as compared to the control data.

The present decreases in neck ligament strength due to whiplash provide support for the ligament injury hypothesis of whiplash syndrome.

Whiplash injuries leading to chronic symptoms have an estimated annual incidence of one million in the USA, resulting in societal costs up to $29 billion. Between 5 and 8% of whiplash patients develop chronic symptoms severe enough to diminish their work capacity. Present knowledge remains incomplete regarding the specific anatomical components injured during whiplash and the causes of the resulting chronic symptoms. MRI and autopsy studies have documented cervical ligament, disc, and facet joint injuries in whiplash victims. The only clinical evidence comes from Lord et al, who used nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves, to successfully relieve pain in whiplash patients. To our knowledge, no previous study has documented injuries to the cervical ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash.

Simulated rear impacts of six whole cervical spine specimens with muscle force replication and surrogate head produced dynamic ligament strains above physiological limits and mechanical spinal instability. The dynamic strains in the anterior longitudinal ligaments and annular fibers above physiological limits were observed at the middle and lower cervical spine. Following whiplash trauma, the ligaments were classified as having sustained no macroscopic rupture, partial rupture with no visible damage to the underlying annulus, or complete rupture with visible anterior annular tears. They found that the ruptured ligaments were associated with significantly greater dynamic intervertebral extension, peak ligament strain, and joint laxity as compared to the uninjured ligaments.

In another study, capsular ligaments at C5–C6 and C6–C7 were found to be at risk for subfailure injury due to excessive dynamic strains. The aforementioned results were supported by Ito et al who documented increased joint laxity at the middle and lower cervical spine based upon flexibility tests performed prior to and following each impact. These researhers hypothesized that microscopic subfailure injuries of the cervical ligaments may injure mechanoreceptive and nociceptive nerve endings and lead to pain and chronic symptoms. Previous in vivo animal studies have investigated the effects of excessive capsular ligament tensile strain on resulting injury severity and chronicity. Using a rat model, Lee et al measured mechanical allodynia via forepaw withdrawal for up to 7 days following the application of either 11 or 34% capsular ligament strain at C6–C7. The 34% strain resulted in mechanical allodynia and injury that was over three times more severe, as compared to the 11% strain. Using a goat model, Lu et al applied tensile load to the C5–C6 capsular ligament and measured the nerve root activity, and capsular ligament load and strain. Correlations between nerve root activity and capsular ligament load and strain indicated that the sensory receptors in the facet joint can detect changes in mechanical stimulus and possibly pain due to non-physiological capsular ligament strain.

While previous studies have reported dynamic cervical ligament strains above physiological limits during simulated whiplash and the effects of excessive capsular ligament strain on resulting injury severity, no study has documented ligament injuries as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. We hypothesize that there exist significant differences in the mechanical properties among the cervical ligaments following whiplash, and between the whiplash exposed and control ligaments. The purpose of this study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties of the human cervical spine ligaments following whiplash. Additionally, the present data were compared to previously reported control data.

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